100 Beste Schriften
Helvetica
Garamond
Frutiger
Bodoni
Futura
Times

Times

The manager of the London daily newspaper The Times, William Lints-Smith, had heard that the respected typographer Stanley Morison (40) was unimpressed by the print quality of his newspaper. On 1 August 1929, they could be found sitting opposite each other at the publishing offices, discussing a redesign of the paper.
Morison, who had been artistic advisor to the typesetting equipment manufacturer Monotype for the previous six years, impressed the newspaperman with his arguments, and on the spur of the moment Lints-Smith offered him a job as an advisor. The first conflict of wills arose when Morison announced that the period after “Times” in the newspaper’s nameplate would not survive his redesign. Lints-Smith consulted with the publishers and, a week later, gave his consent.


The Times through the years:
1: The first edition, published on 1 January 1788, set (partly) in Caslon
2: Before the redesign: black-letter type and a full stop after “Times”
3: Introduction of Times New Roman by Stanley Morison on 3 October 1932
4: Claritas typeface in the 23 April 1953 edition
5: Times Modern by Luke Prowse, in use since 20 November 2006


Towards the end of 1930, after fruitless experiments with the printing machines, Morison decided that the newspaper needed a new typeface of its own. In January 1931 he presented two drafts: a reworked Perpetua and a modernised Plantin. A group of experts decided on the latter, which soon became famous across the world as “Times New Roman” and replaced its predecessor “Times Old Roman”.

The Times draughtsman Victor Lardent created a first version of the new font on the basis of Morison’s specifications. Specialists at Monotype then revised the draft for engraving and casting. The Times edition of 3 October 1932 was the first to be published in the new font, initially for one year’s exclusive use. Monotype then licensed its Times for Linotype and Intertype line-casting machines. The first book set in Times was published in 1934, and in the USA the magazines Time, Life and Fortune switched to the successful new typeface.

New printing machines and better varieties of paper led in the early 1950s to Times’ London name-giver abandoning the font. But it enjoyed a renaissance in the 1980s thanks to the invention of the laser printer, which incorporated it in a digitised form on a memory chip. Together with web browsers and word processing programs, the operating systems Windows and Mac-OS – which include Times New Roman – sustained the font’s profile over many years. And the U.S. State Department recently secured its continued survival by deciding in early 2004 that all diplomatic documents in future must be set in 14-point Times rather than 12-point Courier.
Permalink

Glenn Crawford am: 5. Sep 2012
Times may be ubiquitous, but it is vile and one of the worst serif fonts ever designed. I refuse to ever use it, Arial or Comic Sans... they are the trifecta of embarassing fonts that when used, are clearly a sign of amateur design.
Glenn Peters am: 5. Sep 2012
Ironic that this comment is written in Times...
Biggles am: 6. Sep 2012
Agreed - Times is f-ugly, kills any design




 (not to be published)
(no HTML tags)

For Spam-protection please enter:
How much is 3 + 8?

Akzidenz-Grotesk
Officina
Gill Sans
Univers
Optima
Franklin Gothic
Bembo
Interstate
Thesis
Rockwell
Walbaum
Meta
Trinite
DIN
Matrix
OCR A and B
Avant Garde Gothic
Lucida
Sabon
Zapfino
Letter Gothic
Stone
Arnhem
Minion
Myriad
Rotis
Eurostile
Scala
Syntax
Joanna
Fleischmann
Palatino
Baskerville
Fedra
Gotham
Lexicon
Hands
Metro
Didot
Formata
Caslon
Cooper Black
Peignot
Bell Gothic
Antique Olive
Wilhelm Klingspor Gotisch
Info
Dax
Proforma
Today Sans
Prokyon
Trade Gothic
Swift
Copperplate Gothic
Blur
Base
Bell Centennial
News Gothic
Avenir
Bernhard Modern
Amplitude
Trixie
Quadraat
Neutraface
Nobel
Industria, Insignia, Arcadia
Bickham Script
Bank Gothic
Corporate ASE
Fago
Trajan
Kabel
House Gothic 23
Kosmik
Caecilia
Mrs Eaves
Corpid
Miller
Souvenir
Instant Types
Clarendon
Triplex
Benguiat
Zapf Renaissance
Filosofia
Chalet
Quay Sans
Cezanne
Reporter
Legacy
Agenda
Bello
Dalliance
Mistral
Latest Comments:
Rachel on Bello
Bello typeface
jorge on Chalet
me gustaría tener esta fuente en mi pc
Mkstudio on Mistral
Mistral? You cannot be serious.
Fs
Flash01 Jury
Feed Icon16x16